Mission of the Western Sahara

Home » 2013 » December

Monthly Archives: December 2013

EL-MELHFA: A Symbol of Beauty and Resistance (Voixmag.com)

El-melhfa is a four-meter long by one-meter wide piece of fabric. It is not any ordinary piece of cloth; it is the symbol of the Saharawi heritage, beauty, and resistance.

Many people may view it as a religious, specifically Muslim symbol. But El-melhfa, above all, is cultural and unique to the Saharawi people, used by every ethnic and religious groups within the Saharawi population. It comes in variety of colors, patterns and materials. It can be one color, three or ten. It may be simple or with artistic shapes and patterns or even with the flag of Western Sahara. El-melhfa has different names depending on the colors and the material it is made of. Sometimes, it gets its name from the age group of women.

This article is available in full on:
http://voixmag.com/el-melhfa-a-symbol-of-beauty-and-resistance/

Mandela and Western Sahara

Mandela and Western Sahara

“Once more, we pledge our solidarity with the people of the Saharawi Democratic Republic in their efforts to achieve the freedom and self-determination that are rightfully theirs.” (Speech at OAU Summit 1996, 8 July 1996, Yaounde)

“We further urge that the process remain on course leading to the holding of a referendum over the question of Western Sahara and the final resolution of this matter.” (Speech at the 12th Conference of Heads of State of the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries, 2 September 1998, Durban)

US should stand up for Western Sahara’s self-determination (ncronline)

The most critical issue facing the northwestern Africa region involves Western Sahara, a sparsely populated country on the Atlantic coast that has been under Moroccan occupation since the kingdom invaded the former Spanish colony in 1975, just prior to its scheduled independence. Defying a series of U.N. Security Council resolutions, a landmark World Court decision, and international mediation efforts, the Moroccans have continued to deny the people of the territory their right of self-determination through a U.N.-sponsored referendum. No country recognizes Moroccan sovereignty over the territory and more than 80 nations, as well as the African Union, have formally recognized Western Sahara as an independent state.

This article is available in full on:

http://ncronline.org/news/global/us-should-stand-western-saharas-self-determination#.UrTWu6VpvwM.twitter

Voices from occupied Western Sahara (newstimeafrica.com)

Two Danish journalists, Ane Nordentoft and Ingrid Pedersen, visited occupied Western Sahara in November. They travelled there as tourists as Morocco doesn’t allow journalists to visit the colony, and they were subsequently under constant surveillance by plain-clothes police during their stay.

“Many brave Saharawi’s chose to meet with us, be interviewed, tell about their daily lives, and about demonstrations and protests against the Moroccan occupation and plundering of their country,” the two journalists reported. “They are well aware that they risk persecution and imprisonment for having told their story about the situation in Western Sahara but they chose to do so nevertheless.”

This article is available in full on: http://www.newstimeafrica.com/archives/33674

Western Saharans protest EU-Morocco fishing accord (The Washington Post)

LAAYOUNE, Western Sahara — Police clashed with stone-throwing demonstrators in a city of Western Sahara on Tuesday during a protest against a new fishing accord that gives EU boats access to rich coastal waters.

At first, only a few dozen people were able to gather at a time, chant anti-accord slogans and display banners before riot police chased them away in Laayoune city, knocking many people down.

This article is available in full on: http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/europe/western-saharans-protest-eu-morocco-fishing-accord/2013/12/10/93e36bb8-61dc-11e3-a7b4-4a75ebc432ab_story.html

Western Saharans protest EU-Morocco fishing accord (Miami Herald)

LAAYOUNE, Western Sahara — Police clashed with stone-throwing demonstrators in a city of Western Sahara on Tuesday during a protest against a new fishing accord that gives EU boats access to rich coastal waters.

At first, only a few dozen people were able to gather at a time, chant anti-accord slogans and display banners before riot police chased them away in Laayoune city, knocking many people down.

Protesters calling for independence from Morocco were chased through the streets of the city, and some Spanish activists were arrested.

By nightfall, the demonstrations had spread to other neighborhoods of the city and degenerated into stone throwing clashes between youths and police.

Life in Southwest Algeria: A Civil Service Officer from USAID Visits the Remote Sahrawi Refugee Camps (blog.usaid.gov)

When I first learned that I would be visiting the World Food Program (WFP)operation assisting Sahrawi refugees in Algeria, I was filled with excitement. Since I had not been in the field for a while, I jumped at the opportunity to visit a place that only a few of my colleagues had visited before. I was excited for the opportunity to see first-hand and bring to light challenges facing some of the longest-standing refugee camps in Africa; the site of five small communities of Sahrawi that left their homeland of Western Sahara many years ago.

This article is available in full on http://blog.usaid.gov/2013/12/life-in-southwest-algeria-a-civil-service-officer-from-usaid-visits-the-remote-sahrawi-refugee-camps/#.UrCjAuOx6g4.twitter